Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) 1080p YIFY Movie

Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) 1080p

Fanatic is a movie starring Tallulah Bankhead, Stefanie Powers, and Peter Vaughan. A young woman is terrorized by her deceased fiancé's demented mother who blames her for her son's death.

IMDB: 6.42 Likes

  • Genre: Horror | Thriller
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 1.52G
  • Resolution: 1920*1080 / 23.976 fpsfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 97
  • IMDB Rating: 6.4/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 3 / 30

The Synopsis for Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) 1080p

Patricia Carroll arrives in London to get married with her fiancé Alan Glentower. However, the stubborn Pat decides to pay a visit in the country to Mrs. Trefoile, the mother of her former fiancé Stephen, who died in a car accident. Once there, the religious fanatic Mrs. Trefoile insists to Pat to stay overnight to go to the mass on the next morning. After going to the church, the naive Pat tells Mrs. Trefoile that she was not going to marry Stephen, triggering her insanity. Mrs. Trefoile abducts Pat to purify her sins and make her pure for her beloved son.


The Director and Players for Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) 1080p

[Director]Silvio Narizzano
[Role:]Stefanie Powers
[Role:]Peter Vaughan
[Role:]Maurice Kaufmann
[Role:]Tallulah Bankhead


The Reviews for Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) 1080p


Hag Horror From HammerReviewed byLeonLouisRicciVote: 8/10

Not without a couple of Flaws, this is Nevertheless a Solid Entry into the Hag Horror Wave that Embellished the 1960's. Hammer's Horror here is a 'Real Life" Fanatic (alternate Title) of the no Less than Scary Antagonist as Opposed to a Monster or Vampire, those Religious Types that are so Evident Today.

The Always Dependable Richard Matheson Penned this Script and Tallulah Bankhead gives Her Final Curtain Call as a Craggy Character with a Performance that will not be Denied. She Dominates the Screen with an Acting Style that befits this Mother-In-Law From Hell. That is to say Completely Out to Lunch, Gone Fishing, Toys in the Attic.

But it is in the Cellar that the most Expressionistic, Colorful Confrontations Appear like Monstrous Memories of Unwanted, Underground, Beneath the Surface, Repressed Guilt. It is there that Hammer's Trademark Style is the most Evident and Effective.

The aforementioned Flaws are a Pre-Woman's Liberation Suspension of Disbelief that allows Stefanie Powers no Power to Overcome such a Sickly Tormentor and the Ridiculously Silly Comedic Music used over the Opening Titles and in a few Scenes that feels Jarringly out of Place.

More than lives up to its lurid U.S. title...Reviewed byDoylenfVote: 6/10

TALLULAH BANKHEAD, looking like a ravaged reject from a summer stock version of "The Little Foxes", delivers an appropriately over-the-top performance from this Hammer schlock that borrows from every madhouse movie ever made.

STEFANIE POWERS is the unlucky victim, a young woman who makes a courtesy call on the mother of her dead fiancé, only to discover that she's a religious zealot and a complete madwoman looking for sin in every fabric of Powers' too glamorous wardrobe and make-up. Not only is Bankhead mad, but her servants are enough to scare anyone within sight--including DONALD SUTHERLAND as a retarded man, and YOOTHA JOYCE and HARRY VAUGHAN as an unethical couple badly in need of cash.

Most unrealistic aspect of the story has strong-willed Powers submitting meekly to outrageous requests Bankhead makes upon her arrival instead of packing her things and leaving immediately. But when she fights back, she has to deal with Tallulah and her loyal servants, all of whom make for heavy combat.

Well photographed with some appropriately melodramatic musical flourishes to pump up the fright element, it nevertheless seems like a freak show by the time it reaches its harrowing conclusion. Not until the last moment, does the heroine get some much needed help from a boyfriend who returns for no apparent reason after Bankhead assures him that Powers has already left.

Summing up: Talllulah looks a fright but performs befitting the material--adding horror to the kind of role attracting overage stars in the '60s.

Chew! Chew! The Scenery!Reviewed bygbrumburghVote: 7/10

What inspired casting! The libidinous Tallulah Bankhead as a drab, sober, religious zealot! That alone is worth the price of admission. Thanks to Bette and Joan, the 60s era of Grand Guignol brought some of our favorite glossy "middle-aged" legends back to the somewhat less glossy cinematic limelight. Debbie Reynolds, Shelley Winters, Olivia de Havilland, Geraldine Page, Agnes Moorehead, and Ruth Gordon all took the Gothic plunge. The prerequisites? Simple. Look like hell and act like a mad bull in a china shop. So why not grand ol' Tallulah, dahling?

Here, the "Alabama Foghorn," as Fred Mertz once called her when she guested (hilariously so) on an episode of "The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour," is called upon to play the prim, tight-lipped Mrs. Trefoile, a wacko bible-thumper whose only child died a short time before. When her dead son's fiancee (Stefanie Powers) comes to pay an overdue visit out of respect, she makes a big whoops and tells the old lady that she is about to marry another man. And now the fun begins...

Urged on by her Maker (of course) to exorcise the young girl's demons and restore her purity (she wears that blasphemous red lipstick, you see) and, oh yeah, also to punish her (of course)for her mortal wickedness and ultimate betrayal to her dead son, the old lady (of course) imprisons the young damsel in her medieval-styled lair for a week's worth of (naturally) bible verse and repentance. But then the old crackpot decides she'd be better served if she (you know) takes it up a notch and makes her (of course) a sacrificial lamb instead. See, Trefoile finds out that the girl is still a virgin so (of course) if the girl's still a virgin, her soul can still be (you know) saved and, at the same time, she can be reunited with Trafoile's dead son in heaven, which better serves his memory. You know, kill, I mean save, two birds with one stone.

Seeing Bankhead cavorting around as a dowdy, highly repressed teetotaler while spewing passages from Revelations is an admittedly sinful pleasure. What's even better is that the old girl gets away with it. As bizarre and campy as one could hope for, Bankhead's Mrs. Trefoile is still all prickly seriousness and deadly menace, possessing a convincingly firm, fervent gait. She doesn't really play the joke. Moreover, she manages to slightly stroke audience sympathy with human shadings of loneliness and utter despair. The atmosphere is appropriately claustrophobic and suspense is built up expertly too, with every Bankhead entrance punctuated by creepy, stringy harpsichord music.

Fun too is watching Bankhead's Addams Family-like household run amok, especially Donald Sutherland as a mute, dim-witted servant -- a role I'm sure he'd love to erase permanently from his resume. Poor bruised and bloodied Stefanie Powers does yeoman's work here, gaining our sympathy from the onset and making a wonderfully feisty "straight man" to the Bankhead histrionics.

And just wait until the skeletons come out of the closet. Like you knew they would! Bankhead's final curtain in the flick is a great wallow. And speaking of final curtains, this was regrettably her last feature film.

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